Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Bloggers: motives, methods, and madness


Here is a topic that has been on my mind for a long time: Why do people "speak" to other people -- total strangers -- via blogs? After all, it seems like an odd expenditure of a limited commodity: time. I might even classify the behavior as some sort of madness. As for that latter assertion, my own blogging experience is an illustrative example, and perhaps I will "speak" more about my motives, methods, and madness in the near future, but first I would like to hear other people "speak" about their motives and methods. So, go ahead. I look forward to hearing from you.



18 comments:

  1. I started Books, Inq. while I was book review editor at The Inquirer. It was an extension of the job. I took it with me because I needed something to do to keep me out of trouble after I retired. It had also attracted an audience.

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    1. Frank, "audience," with its roots and definitions is the key word!

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  2. Erm... Because talking to strangers is often interesting, informative and full of possibilities. I like sharing stuff I've found, books I've read and questions I'd like opinions on. Blogging is a very human activity.

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    1. CK, this all suggests the need for dialogue rather than monologue; that issue undermines and frustrates much of what I have attempted.

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    2. Oh, I think there's *plenty* of dialogue going on here.... Plus, you ask questions of your potential readership. Presumably you want answers - hence dialogue?

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  3. I blog, Tim, because I am enriched by what my fellow bloggers have to offer. Fo me, a blog is a sort of conversation between people. I like being part of that worldwide conversation.

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    1. Margot, I think your blog is a wonderful model for aspiring bloggers. Alas, my results have not matched up with my goals, and I'm often like that very old tree falling silently and pointlessly in the forest when so few are around to hear it.

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  4. Tim: your blogging attracts and informs many people; communication is the lubricant that facilitates knowledge and growth... It's admirable...
    I'd blog but I can't figure ou the tech part of setting it up.. Well, also. Think I don't know enough...
    I think this Emedia works well becaueit eliminates distraction and allows deeper connections to evolve without side issues overwhelming the exchange ...

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    1. Mudpuddle, "many people"? Hmmm. "Lubricant"? Now that's funny!

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  5. I started back in 2007 just as an excuse to write. But now that I'm long removed from university, goodreads and the book-blogging community are practically the only place I have to have serious discussions about literature. Considering that I work in a library, that sounds crazy, but most people read fiction..and there's only so much to say about run and gun action thrillers, or romannces, or forensic murder mysteries..

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    1. Stephen, yes, genre fiction has its limits. I have long thought that I'd enjoy working in a library, but I might not be very good at it because of so many distractions and detours. Work would suffer.

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  6. In my case it is madness :)

    One reason that I blog is that I always liked talking about books. I know too few people in the real world who want to indulge my interest. Blogging lets me talk about books with people all over the world.

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    1. Brian, yes, I have the same experience. Book blogging has been an outlet beyond the past: no more classrooms and reviews for publications.

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  7. I talk to fellow bloggers because otherwise I don't have people to talk to about the books I read and the writers I like.
    I don't know anyone around my age that likes Tolstoy or Melville.

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    1. Do, thanks for visiting and commenting again. Wouldn't past generations be dismayed by this kind of communication! We live in a brave new world.

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  8. I first discovered the book blog world about nine years ago. I read a work, The Elegance of the Hedgehog and I loved it and identified with the central character. I wanted to see how others reacted to it and a Google search led me to the book blog world. For a few months I followed lots of book blogs and then I decided it would be fun to start my own. It brought me into contact with readers worldwide, working on the look of my blog also was an "artistic thing" for me. I began to learn of hundreds of writers I had never heard of I know greatly admire. I ended up doing Q and A sessions with 100 authors and learned a lot from this. In my eight years of blogging I have seen lots of blogs come and go, some just fad away, others explain why they are quitting. Now I sometimes go back and read old posts and it brings the memory of the works back for me. Now reading and blogging are very intertwined for me. I hope younger bloggers will one day be able to read their thoughts on books they read decades ago. Book blogging has given me an identity I never had before. I used to just be a dad and a husband and a corporate drone, now I a, proud to be part of the great international book blog community.

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    1. I'm fascinated and impressed, Mel. I'm also envious of your blogging qualities.

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