Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Confessions of an addicted book buyer


This morning, while I thought I was strong enough to resist the temptations in a used bookstore, I fell off the wagon. As an old fool who has long been addicted to book buying, I confess to going into the store with my wife, and then -- before you could say, "Will that be cash or charge?" -- I bought a bag-full of used books and contributed too many of my dollars to the bookstore owner. So, even though I have in the past made and broken all sorts of promises about my reading plans in this blog, I am audacious and obnoxious enough to make one more semi-serious promise to you: Hey, you never know but what I might be discussing a wide variety of books here in the future.


Stay tuned for the possibility of those "reviews," discussions, and postings. Moreover, I have a feeling that I will be returning to that bookstore. Help! I need an intervention!


However, now that you're here, you might as well make your confession: tell me about your book addiction. I cannot offer absolution, but I can offer you these comforting words: misery loves company. So tell me about your book addiction miseries. I'm listening.




22 comments:

  1. My bedroom walls are surrounded by books. My bed's headboard is a bookcase. Next to that is a bookcase with multiple layers of books. Next to that is a six-foot bookcase, filled with Asimov. On the floor is an Ottoman,its interior filled with the books. Opposite is another six-foot bookcase, filled with books save the space made for a stereo. Next to it? A counter with books stacked on top of it. Next to that? A three-foot bookcase, filled with Trek paperbacks. Nearby is a closeet with two boxes of books inside. In front of the closet is a massive box with even more books that I'm planning to donate. Every month I go to my university and get 10 or so books, and my kindle has at least 20 titles on it I haven't read yet. And every time I go to work at a library, I look around for books. I frequently look at goodreads to see if I can find more books.

    I need help, an intervention, SOMETHING!

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    1. Stephen, it will not make you feel any better, but I can really relate to the "problem." Just keep reading, one day at a time, friend. Hang in there! Are you also, like me, an obsessive-compulsive bookshelf organizer? That is another symptom of terminal book addiction. The prognosis then is hopeless!

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    2. I'm too busy reading to organize, but I do have a couple of collections: my Asimov case, my Trek case, my science cabinet, my Europe shelf, and my Mideast-Asia shelf. My bed's headboard collects philosophy, politics, and that broad expanse of books I call "civic awareness" -- books on urban planning or the power grid, etc.

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    3. You work in library? It must be like being a kid in a candy shop! I'm envious.

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    4. Unfortunately Stephen & I are feeding each others addiction... [grin]

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  2. I am a self confessed book addict. I control it to some extent - adding to my Amazon Wish List rather than buying things, only buying online at weekends and every other month (and equally bizarre and less than effective strategies) but that still means I have hundreds of unread books - probably enough already to take me well into old(er) age. Does that stop me? Of course not!

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    1. CK, I can relate to the buying but not reading pathology. My wife complains that I buy books but do not read all of them, and I don't understand the point she might be making because it all seems normal to me.

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    2. Completely agree. It's happened before when I've held off buying a particular only to do so years later to find it had gone out of print! Never Again! Plus if I ever became trapped in my house for 5-10 years I'd have plenty to read.... Seems legit to me. Plus I have no one nagging me about taking up so much room with book stacks....

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    3. Tell your wife it's a collection....

      Or maybe that what's unknown is bigger and more important that what's known?

      Auto-correct says "maybe" ought to be "maypole," so maybe you should just dance around your books?

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    4. The dance will unnerve her! Fred Astaire I ain't.

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  3. Oh, there's no way I can go into a bookstore, Tim, and leave empty-handed. It's just not in my DNA. As a matter of fact, almost two years ago, my husband and I commissioned a friend who's a talented carpenter to make us a new set of bookshelves - just because I can't stop acquiring books. And don't ask me how many are on my Kindle...

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  4. Margot, CyberKitten, Stephen . . . I cannot imagine a home without books, and I have a love-hate relationship with Amazon (i.e., I hate the fact that Amazon has driven so many bookstores out of business, but I love the fact that Amazon has so many books available for Kindle).

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  5. Not to defend the big against the small, but amazon's marketplace does allow smaller bookstores to market their holdings to a MUCh bigger audience. For instance, the independent bookstore I enjoyed visiting in Las Cruces has a presence on amazon. I use the Marketplace to get bargains, or specific editions..

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    1. Good point, Stephen, as I have often ordered used books from vendors through Amazon; however, quality of the used books has been a problem every now and then.

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  6. YESYES, i confess, i too am a paid in full member of the Insane Book Buyers club... how else can i explain dropping almost $200 at Robert's Books in Lincoln City last month... butbut it's not my fault, i NEEDED them...

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    1. Mudpuddle, bookstores are dangerous! Be careful out there!

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  7. One huge benefit of having a book blog, for me anyway, is free books. This feeds by new book addiction.

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    1. Mel u, I still receive ARCs from publishers even though I haven't been reviewing for several years. I feel somewhat but not too guilty about receiving but not reading them.

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  8. Tim,

    Sorry to disappoint you, but I'm not addicted. Just because I have ten bookcases scattered throughout the house doesn't mean I'm addicted. I can stop, anytime I want.

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    1. Only ten, Fred? That's self control!

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    2. Tim,

      Exactly, I'm in control and therefore not addicted.

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